CC 1420 LECTURE 6: POLAROID TROUBLE SHOOTING – UNDER/OVER-EXPOSED IMAGE

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-title

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-icon

 

INTRODUCTION
instant-university_yellow-border

Controlling the exposure value (EV) could be really challenging to both beginners and experienced users. Sometimes you may find it difficult to correctly set the exposure wheel. This may result in over/ under-exposed shots.

Impossible film can be mainly classified into two types: high ISO (600) and low ISO (SX-70). Many people are confused about HOW to take a correctly exposed picture.

 

PART 1.

instant-university_yellow-border

Tips about setting the brightness

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-#1

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#2

To use 600 film in a default ISO100 camera(e.g. SX-70 Model 1, Model 2, Sonar, Alpha)

⇒ Use Flash (half power)/ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to darken (black) / Use ND filter

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-#1

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#6

To Use SX-70 film in default ISO100 camera

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-#2

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#10

To use 600 film in default ISO600 camera (e.g.SLR670a/SLR680)

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-#2

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#13

To use SX-70 film in default ISO600 camera

⇒ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to lighten (white)

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-6-Polaroid-under-over-exposure-#3

 

PART 2.

instant-university_yellow-border

Reasons of Under/Over-exposed image

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-1-film-storage-#9

Film to use corresponding to indoor/ outdoor?

You are suggested to use flash high ISO film (600) indoor and low ISO film (100) outdoor. If you plan to take pictures in both indoor and outdoor, you should use low ISO film and use flash if necessary.

In a condition of very bright light, even when you use SX-70 film (ISO100 film), it is still possible to result in over-exposed images. There are 2 solutions: adjust the exposure wheel to darken, or use an ND filter and keep the exposure wheel in the middle position.

Most of the SX-70 cameras are programmed as ISO100. In most cases you should use corresponding SX-70 film (ISO100 film) as this will ensure the image is correctly exposed. If you want to use 600 film (approx. 6 times more light sensitive than SX-70 film) in your SX-70 camera, you need to put an ND filter before shooting or you will get over-exposed images.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-1-film-storage-#11

Temperature differs?

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#8

Photo tends to look pale and with low contrast under cold weather.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9When shooting in hot weather, the image tends to look darker and grainy.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-1-film-storage-#13

Shield after shooting?

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-1-film-storage-#4

Impossible film tends to be sensitive to light. Shield the picture immediately after ejection and avoid exposure under the Sun or bright light. You can use the darkslide (the black cover that ejects immediately after you insert a new film pack) to cover the image. Or even better, use Impossible Frog Tongue to make the shielding easier. Once it is ejected, leave the picture face down for 10 minutes for Impossible B&W films, and 30 minutes for colour films. This will largely increase the successful rate of developing nice pictures.

 

REMARKS

instant-university_yellow-border

  1. Frog Tongue is available for all boxtype/ folding SX-70 and Image/Spectra cameras.

2. The light bulbs on top of SX-70 is the original Polaroid Flash Bar. It is a disposable flash with a 10-times use flashbulb unit. Suitable for SX-70 Camera/ OneStep Rainbow. These flash bars are no longer manufactured and have been gradually replaced by electronic flash.

IU_post1

That’s why MINT created MiNT Flash Bar 2, which is a revolutionary re-usable high quality electronic flash bar device for all Polaroid folding and box-type SX-70 type cameras. It comes with 2 filters for your creativity.

mint_flash_bar2-sx70-camera

3. Lens Set for Polaroid SX-70 Cameras is also available. The set includes Fisheye, Close-up, Blue filter, Yellow filter, and ND filter. You can get as close as 12cm, take selfies with friends, get the nice blue colour of the sky, create higher contrast in B&W photos, and shoot 600 film in SX-70 cameras. It is definitely another must have item besides the flash.

Advertisements

ECOR 1100 Lecture 3: Understanding exposure value (EV)

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-title

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-icon

HISTORYinstant-university_yellow-border

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-#1

In 1950s, Friedrich Deckel, a German shutter manufacturer, first developed the concept of exposure value (EV). He attempted to simplify choosing among combinations of equivalent camera settings.

 

DEFINITIONinstant-university_yellow-border

Exposure value is defined as the exact amount of light hitting a photographic film or image sensor determined by lens aperture and shutter speed, to product a picture which is correctly exposed – neither too light nor too dark.

 

WHAT IS IT?instant-university_yellow-border

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-#2

In photography, EV is a numerical scale that represents a combination of a camera’s shutter speeds (determine the amount of motion blur) and f-numbers (determine the depth of field), such that all combinations that yield the same exposure have the same EV value.

Even though all camera settings giving the same EV, it does not mean that they give the same picture. For instance, if you fasten up the shutter speed, the aperture will become larger automatically for compensation, in turns your image maintain the same EV but with shallower depth of field.

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-#3

EV also indicates an interval on the photographic exposure scale, 1 EV equals to a standard power of 2 exposure steps, that is, an increment of one step on the EV scale indicates a one step (also called as a stop) increase in exposure, and vice versa.

 

WHEN?instant-university_yellow-border

instant-university_ECOR1100-lecture-3-understanding-exposure-value-#4

If you think your image is quite dark, you can increase the EV. Conversely, if the image is too bright, you can simply decrease the EV.

 

WHICH CAMERA?instant-university_yellow-border

In fact, many instant cameras provide the exposure controls, like Polaroid cameras and MiNT InstantFlex TL70. For example, the EV numbers on Polaroid Land camera Model 180 range from EV 5 to EV 22 while MiNT InstantFlex TL70’s offers EV +/-1.

CC 1420 Lecture 3: Air traveling with instant films and cameras

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-title

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-icon

WHY ANNOTATE?
instant-university_yellow-border

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#1

Many Instant Photographers may have the same X-ray concern about carrying undeveloped films when traveling. In this chapter, you will learn what to do and what NOT to do when traveling, without X-ray damaging to your instant films and cameras.

 

HOW?
instant-university_yellow-border

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#2

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#3Before departure

BRING FILMS AS CARRY-ON LUGGAGE

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#4

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#5Unprocessed film is sensitive to light just as they are waiting to be exposed. Although Impossible Project film has a rather low ISO of 160 for SX-70, and ISO 640 for 600 cameras, X-ray of checked baggage screener may still penetrate and expose the film. Whereas carry-on baggage screener has a much milder X-ray – films under ISO800 such as Fujifilm instax mini film and instax wide film are usually not affected.

So never pack unprocessed film in baggage that will be checked. Or you can politely insist on hand-inspection of the film whenever possible.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#6

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

PHOTOGRAPHING IN EXTREME TEMPERATURES

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#8Extreme cold guideinstant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#8

When you want to take photos in a freezing cold place (e.g. -10°C to -15°C / 14°F to 5°F and below), you should put the camera inside your bag or  your coat pocket and keep it near your body prior to shooting. Using your body temperature is a good way to ensure that your camera will work well.

Instant film is highly sensitive to temperature. After the camera ejects picture, immediately place it in your pocket or directly onto heat pads. A moderate room temperature of around 25°C / 77°F is optimal for developing camera pictures. Warm the photo with your body temperature is the easiest way. Low temperature will overexpose a photo. It may look bluish, lightened and less contrasted.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9Extreme hot guideinstant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9

Travelling in a place with hot weather (e.g. 35°C to 40°C / 95°F to 104°F and above) is a different situation. Keeping the developing image under shade and keep it cool will help correcting the white balance and prevent reddish and yellowish to a large extent. DO NOT leave the exposing photo under direct sunlight.

Tips:
Hot temperature has a greater effect on B&W film than color. If you wish to get a better result with Polaroid cameras, snap with Impossible Color Film!

Impossible Project film can deliver good results when used within a temperature range of 13°C to 28°C / 55°F to 82°F, while 5°C to 40°C / 41°F to 104°F for Fujifilm instant film.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#10

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

SHIELDING

Even with Color Protection Film, it is possible to be overexposed under strong sunlight. The first few seconds are extremely crucial for image development. Always shield the film from light when it is ejected.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#11
Can I use a black card, to cover the film with a hand or quickly turn the photo upside down?

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#12
To put a black card at picture exit slot is economical and may help, but it will not work as perfect as the Frog Tongue from Impossible Project.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#13

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

THE USE OF MANUAL FOCUS

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#14

Some Polaroid cameras such as SX-70 Sonar, use sonar to auto focus. When you are on a coach or railway cabin, visiting in museum or aquarium, as long as there is glass between you and the object, the sonar auto focus will not work because sonar will bounce back when it hits the glass. In order to shoot through glass, simply switch to manual focus and you are good to go!