CC 1235 LECTURE 4: Factors affecting the tones of photos

Even when we use the same Polaroid, the outcome may look so different in a sense that the pictures have various tones. Some are yellowish and reddish, while some may have the blue toned.

What to determine the tone of a picture? Is it related to the camera or the film? We list out 4 major factors to clear your mind.

1. Weather/ physical condition

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Photographer: On Chan / Location: Ethiopia, Africa

Instant film is highly sensitive to temps. When you shoot in a freezing cold place (e.g. -10°C to -15°C/ 14°F to 5°F and below), the photos tend to look bluish, lightened and less contrasted. And the heat does affect the film. Under hot weather of 35°C to 40°C/ 95°F to 104°F and above, the images all turn out with a reddish or yellowish overtone.

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Photographer: Ming Chan / Location: Hokkaido, Japan

The tone of colour varies under different temperatures. In other words, it depends on how cold/warm you are placing the photo for development. For the Impossible’s current generation of films (mid 2016), the full development takes 20-30 minutes. During this period of time, if the temperature is around 10°C to 15°C/ 50°F to 59°F, the image tends to look bluish, whereas if the temperature is above 30°C/ 86°F, the image tends to look reddish.

2. Source of light

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Photographer: Eric Luk / Camera: SLR670-S / Film: Color Film for 600

It is also related to the colour temperature of light source. Sun is actually appearing bluish in hue, but incandescent light bulbs eject light in yellow. Our eyes have the ability to compensate this colour difference but instant films don’t. So we usually find the bluish image outdoor and yellowish toned indoor shots.

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Photographer: Eric Luk / Camera: SLR670-S / Film: Color Film for 600

Instant film is daylight balanced. From sunrise to sunset, dawn to dusk, the amount of sunlight determines the tone of picture, too.

3. Batch of film

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Photographer: Simon Bernabel / Film: Color Film for 600

Different batch of film can cause a lot, too. Before mid 2015, Impossible has not come up with the new formula chemical, so the photos were still a little bit reddish and yellowish. Starting from around Apr/ May 2016, Impossible have changed the formula, more chemicals are allowed to spill over. The new films produce more bluish images.

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Photographer: Harriet Browse / Film: Color Film for 600

4. The application of filters

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The use of accessories gives the photo a special tone. For instance, the blue filter will raise the colour temperature, filling blue tones all over the canvas.

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Photographer: Ming Chan / Accessories: MiNT Lens Set (blue filter)

Therefore, please noted that the colour tone is nothing to do with the camera. It matters most with the film and the environment you are photographing.

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LECTURE 1: INSTANTFLEX TL70 LENS SET BY MINT

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MiNT just releases InstantFlex TL70 2.0, their second generation of twin lens instant camera, together with a lens set particularly for TL70. The set includes three ND Filters – ND2, ND4 & ND8, Close-up Lens and Lens Hood. We are pleased to get the set before it has officially released and now we can’t wait to share our experience with you!

 

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For InstantFlex TL70, the closest shooting distance is 48cm. With applying the Close-up Lens, you can shoot as close as 18cm.

You can take a close-up shot without leaving much background, at the same time, create a shallow depth of view image (by using a big aperture like f/5.6).

 

NEUTRAL DENSITY FILTERS – ND2, ND4, ND8 ✮instant-university_yellow-border

The set includes three ND filters and you may wonder when and which you are required to use them.

The use of ND Filter is to speed up the shutter. Actually, the difference among three ND filters is their intensity to reduce the amount of incoming light entering the camera. ND8 can block the most of light while ND2 block the least.

Fuji mini film has high ISO of 800 while it has high sensitivity to light. Especially when you shoot in outdoor, the sunny/ bright condition will easily lead to an over-exposed photo. Under this circumstance, you have to decide which ND Filter to use in order to obtain a satisfactory image.

When there is a red light shown in viewfinder, it means the shutter speed of camera is now 1/500. The relatively slow shutter speed allows excess amount of light entering the camera, tends to create over-exposure image.

The solution is easy. You can download a smartphone light meter to assist, it helps to achieve a correct exposure. For ISO, set it as 800 (default ISO of Fuji mini film). For aperture, set it the same as which you set on your TL70. Then you will get a number of time automatically.

If the time shows “1/1000”, you need to apply ND2 for shooting. If the time shows “1/2000”, use ND4. If the time shows “1/4000”, use ND8.

 

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As long as protecting the lens, the hood can avoid glare and lens flare. So basically you can apply the hood always.

 

 

CC 1420 LECTURE 7: DAILY CLEANING CHECKLIST#2 – FOR MINT INSTANTFLEX TL70

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INTRODUCTION
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In lecture 2, we have discussed about a cleaning method for the Polaroid SX-70 cameras. After opening the film door, it is easy to see if the rollers are clean. But for some other instant cameras like InstantFlex TL70, it may be difficult to check the rollers as they are located inside the camera body. Don’t worry, we have a solution for this. Apart from asking MiNT warranty centre for regular service, you can do it yourself.

 

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When is the time to clean the rollers?

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When you found that there are some unwanted white spots or marks shown on the film, this is probably the cleaning time.

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1. Put double sided tape on one side of the film in order to make this side sticky.

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Noted: We recommend you use the Scotch Permanent Double Sided Tape and don’t stick the tape on double sides of film at one time. If the tape is too thick the film may be hard to be ejected from the camera.

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2. Open the film door and put the film close to the rollers, assist with hand.

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3. Press the film-ejecting button.

4. When the rollers are pressing the film, the tape sticks away the dirt on one rollers.

Noted: As the width of film is shorter than the length of rollers, when you place the film near the ejecting mouth, put it incline to one side first, and the other side next, this can make sure you clean the whole roller.

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5. Repeat step 2 to 4. This time, turn the film over and let the sticky side touch the other roller.

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6. Try to do the above steps several time until you think it is okay.

Noted: If you think the the tapes aren’t sticky anymore, you should change a new film with new tape to continue.

CC 1420 LECTURE 6: POLAROID TROUBLE SHOOTING – UNDER/OVER-EXPOSED IMAGE

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INTRODUCTION
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Controlling the exposure value (EV) could be really challenging to both beginners and experienced users. Sometimes you may find it difficult to correctly set the exposure wheel. This may result in over/ under-exposed shots.

Impossible film can be mainly classified into two types: high ISO (600) and low ISO (SX-70). Many people are confused about HOW to take a correctly exposed picture.

 

PART 1.

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Tips about setting the brightness

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To use 600 film in a default ISO100 camera(e.g. SX-70 Model 1, Model 2, Sonar, Alpha)

⇒ Use Flash (half power)/ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to darken (black) / Use ND filter

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To Use SX-70 film in default ISO100 camera

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

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To use 600 film in default ISO600 camera (e.g.SLR670a/SLR680)

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

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To use SX-70 film in default ISO600 camera

⇒ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to lighten (white)

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PART 2.

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Reasons of Under/Over-exposed image

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Film to use corresponding to indoor/ outdoor?

You are suggested to use flash high ISO film (600) indoor and low ISO film (100) outdoor. If you plan to take pictures in both indoor and outdoor, you should use low ISO film and use flash if necessary.

In a condition of very bright light, even when you use SX-70 film (ISO100 film), it is still possible to result in over-exposed images. There are 2 solutions: adjust the exposure wheel to darken, or use an ND filter and keep the exposure wheel in the middle position.

Most of the SX-70 cameras are programmed as ISO100. In most cases you should use corresponding SX-70 film (ISO100 film) as this will ensure the image is correctly exposed. If you want to use 600 film (approx. 6 times more light sensitive than SX-70 film) in your SX-70 camera, you need to put an ND filter before shooting or you will get over-exposed images.

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Temperature differs?

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Photo tends to look pale and with low contrast under cold weather.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9When shooting in hot weather, the image tends to look darker and grainy.

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Shield after shooting?

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Impossible film tends to be sensitive to light. Shield the picture immediately after ejection and avoid exposure under the Sun or bright light. You can use the darkslide (the black cover that ejects immediately after you insert a new film pack) to cover the image. Or even better, use Impossible Frog Tongue to make the shielding easier. Once it is ejected, leave the picture face down for 10 minutes for Impossible B&W films, and 30 minutes for colour films. This will largely increase the successful rate of developing nice pictures.

 

REMARKS

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  1. Frog Tongue is available for all boxtype/ folding SX-70 and Image/Spectra cameras.

2. The light bulbs on top of SX-70 is the original Polaroid Flash Bar. It is a disposable flash with a 10-times use flashbulb unit. Suitable for SX-70 Camera/ OneStep Rainbow. These flash bars are no longer manufactured and have been gradually replaced by electronic flash.

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That’s why MINT created MiNT Flash Bar 2, which is a revolutionary re-usable high quality electronic flash bar device for all Polaroid folding and box-type SX-70 type cameras. It comes with 2 filters for your creativity.

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3. Lens Set for Polaroid SX-70 Cameras is also available. The set includes Fisheye, Close-up, Blue filter, Yellow filter, and ND filter. You can get as close as 12cm, take selfies with friends, get the nice blue colour of the sky, create higher contrast in B&W photos, and shoot 600 film in SX-70 cameras. It is definitely another must have item besides the flash.

PH 1000 Lecture 1: Camera! Go! Think!

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Nature of instant camera

Image develops within 5 mins after being ejected from the camera.

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Can machines think? This is a long debating question raised by Alan Turing, a British pioneering computer scientist.

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Alan Turing

Camera is without a doubt one type of machines. From the time we load the camera with film, check settings, set aperture and shutter speed, correctly focus the desired subject, get nice depth of field and composition as we want, to finally clicking the shutter button. The light capturing actions all happen in a split second.

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Obviously we, humans, are the one who control the process. But have you ever wondered if camera has the ability to think during the image taking process?

If camera could think, in what way would it affect the final images? Would it adjust the settings and create a different picture and style from photographers? Can it be said that some great photographic arts such as Moon and Half Dome from Ansel Adams are actually masterpieces from camera itself?

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Moon and Half Dome by Ansel Adams (Credits: http://www.ansel-adams.org)

If camera could not think, does it mean humans are the sole controller of the image taking process? Like famous quote from Ansel Adams: ‘you don’t take a photograph, you make it’. Let’s think about this.

ECOR 1100 Lecture 3: Understanding exposure value (EV)

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HISTORYinstant-university_yellow-border

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In 1950s, Friedrich Deckel, a German shutter manufacturer, first developed the concept of exposure value (EV). He attempted to simplify choosing among combinations of equivalent camera settings.

 

DEFINITIONinstant-university_yellow-border

Exposure value is defined as the exact amount of light hitting a photographic film or image sensor determined by lens aperture and shutter speed, to product a picture which is correctly exposed – neither too light nor too dark.

 

WHAT IS IT?instant-university_yellow-border

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In photography, EV is a numerical scale that represents a combination of a camera’s shutter speeds (determine the amount of motion blur) and f-numbers (determine the depth of field), such that all combinations that yield the same exposure have the same EV value.

Even though all camera settings giving the same EV, it does not mean that they give the same picture. For instance, if you fasten up the shutter speed, the aperture will become larger automatically for compensation, in turns your image maintain the same EV but with shallower depth of field.

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EV also indicates an interval on the photographic exposure scale, 1 EV equals to a standard power of 2 exposure steps, that is, an increment of one step on the EV scale indicates a one step (also called as a stop) increase in exposure, and vice versa.

 

WHEN?instant-university_yellow-border

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If you think your image is quite dark, you can increase the EV. Conversely, if the image is too bright, you can simply decrease the EV.

 

WHICH CAMERA?instant-university_yellow-border

In fact, many instant cameras provide the exposure controls, like Polaroid cameras and MiNT InstantFlex TL70. For example, the EV numbers on Polaroid Land camera Model 180 range from EV 5 to EV 22 while MiNT InstantFlex TL70’s offers EV +/-1.

CC 1235 Lecture 1: Choose right film for my camera

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IMPOSSIBLE EVOLUTION
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Old cameras & new films

After Polaroid Corporation announced that all instant films would no longer be produced after 2008, The Impossible Project was founded and bought the entire Polaroid factory in EnschedeNetherlands – they pledged to bring Polaroid film back.

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AT PRESENT
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The Impossible Project is the only company in the world producing instant films for classic Polaroid SX-70 and 600 cameras. Another famous Japan-based company Fujifilm produces not only digital cameras but also instant cameras and films. 

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In this lecture, you will know clearly about films that are still being widely used and how to choose the right film for your camera.

 

THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT
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Instant films produced by The Impossible Project can be categorised by 4 types:

instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#3 Polaroid SX-70 – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#4 Polaroid 600-Type  – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#5 Polaroid Image / Spectra – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#6 8×10 Cameras and Backs – Color / Black & White

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It’s easy to know which film is compatible with your camera. Simply open the film door and you will see a sticker indicating “600” type film / “SX-70” type film / “Image” or “Spectra” type film.

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Polaroid SX-70 film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid SX-70
– Polaroid SX-70 Model 3
– Polaroid Onestep
-Polaroid Time Zero Onestep
– Polaroid 1000
– Polaroid 1000 Deluxe
– Polaroid Supercolor 1000 Deluxe
– Polaroid 3000
– Polaroid Pronto! RF

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Polaroid 600 film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid 600 Autofocus 660
– Polaroid SLR 680
-Polaroid SLR 690
– Polaroid Integral 600 series
– Polaroid One Step close-up
– Polaroid One Step AF Autofocus Digital Exposure System
– Polaroid Sun 600 LMS Light Management System

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Polaroid Image / Spectra film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid Spectra / Image series

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In March 2015, Impossible announced the initial launch of Generation 2.0 (Gen2.0) film for the Black & White line. Now, the newly launched Black & White films work with all types of cameras stated above. New formula of Black & White has a quicker developing time, increased contrast and tonality.

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In January 2016, Impossible launches Generation 3.0 (Gen3.0) film for the Color line. At present, it is exclusively for Impossible Member to test before general release. This generation of color film marks a significant improvement on Impossible’s current 600 color film formula. Photos develop in less half the time.

 

FUJIFILM
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Fujifilm now has 3 types of film: Instax mini film, Instax wide film and FP-film (packfilm). They are available in color films only. FP-3000B (ISO 3000 Black & White) was discontinued in May 2015.

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Instax mini film
is acceptable with:

– MiNT InstantFlex TL70
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 7S
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 8
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 25
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 50S
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 70
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 NEO CLASSIC
– Lomo’Instant series

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Instax wide film
is acceptable with:

– Fujifilm Instax 210 Wide
– Fujifilm Instax Wide 300
– Lomo’Instant Wide series

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FP-100C film
is designed to be used in the instant backs for medium format SLR cameras and Polaroid Land cameras.