CC 1235 LECTURE 4: Factors affecting the tones of photos

Even when we use the same Polaroid, the outcome may look so different in a sense that the pictures have various tones. Some are yellowish and reddish, while some may have the blue toned.

What to determine the tone of a picture? Is it related to the camera or the film? We list out 4 major factors to clear your mind.

1. Weather/ physical condition

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Photographer: On Chan / Location: Ethiopia, Africa

Instant film is highly sensitive to temps. When you shoot in a freezing cold place (e.g. -10°C to -15°C/ 14°F to 5°F and below), the photos tend to look bluish, lightened and less contrasted. And the heat does affect the film. Under hot weather of 35°C to 40°C/ 95°F to 104°F and above, the images all turn out with a reddish or yellowish overtone.

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Photographer: Ming Chan / Location: Hokkaido, Japan

The tone of colour varies under different temperatures. In other words, it depends on how cold/warm you are placing the photo for development. For the Impossible’s current generation of films (mid 2016), the full development takes 20-30 minutes. During this period of time, if the temperature is around 10°C to 15°C/ 50°F to 59°F, the image tends to look bluish, whereas if the temperature is above 30°C/ 86°F, the image tends to look reddish.

2. Source of light

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Photographer: Eric Luk / Camera: SLR670-S / Film: Color Film for 600

It is also related to the colour temperature of light source. Sun is actually appearing bluish in hue, but incandescent light bulbs eject light in yellow. Our eyes have the ability to compensate this colour difference but instant films don’t. So we usually find the bluish image outdoor and yellowish toned indoor shots.

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Photographer: Eric Luk / Camera: SLR670-S / Film: Color Film for 600

Instant film is daylight balanced. From sunrise to sunset, dawn to dusk, the amount of sunlight determines the tone of picture, too.

3. Batch of film

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Photographer: Simon Bernabel / Film: Color Film for 600

Different batch of film can cause a lot, too. Before mid 2015, Impossible has not come up with the new formula chemical, so the photos were still a little bit reddish and yellowish. Starting from around Apr/ May 2016, Impossible have changed the formula, more chemicals are allowed to spill over. The new films produce more bluish images.

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Photographer: Harriet Browse / Film: Color Film for 600

4. The application of filters

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The use of accessories gives the photo a special tone. For instance, the blue filter will raise the colour temperature, filling blue tones all over the canvas.

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Photographer: Ming Chan / Accessories: MiNT Lens Set (blue filter)

Therefore, please noted that the colour tone is nothing to do with the camera. It matters most with the film and the environment you are photographing.

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LECTURE 1: INSTANTFLEX TL70 LENS SET BY MINT

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MiNT just releases InstantFlex TL70 2.0, their second generation of twin lens instant camera, together with a lens set particularly for TL70. The set includes three ND Filters – ND2, ND4 & ND8, Close-up Lens and Lens Hood. We are pleased to get the set before it has officially released and now we can’t wait to share our experience with you!

 

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For InstantFlex TL70, the closest shooting distance is 48cm. With applying the Close-up Lens, you can shoot as close as 18cm.

You can take a close-up shot without leaving much background, at the same time, create a shallow depth of view image (by using a big aperture like f/5.6).

 

NEUTRAL DENSITY FILTERS – ND2, ND4, ND8 ✮instant-university_yellow-border

The set includes three ND filters and you may wonder when and which you are required to use them.

The use of ND Filter is to speed up the shutter. Actually, the difference among three ND filters is their intensity to reduce the amount of incoming light entering the camera. ND8 can block the most of light while ND2 block the least.

Fuji mini film has high ISO of 800 while it has high sensitivity to light. Especially when you shoot in outdoor, the sunny/ bright condition will easily lead to an over-exposed photo. Under this circumstance, you have to decide which ND Filter to use in order to obtain a satisfactory image.

When there is a red light shown in viewfinder, it means the shutter speed of camera is now 1/500. The relatively slow shutter speed allows excess amount of light entering the camera, tends to create over-exposure image.

The solution is easy. You can download a smartphone light meter to assist, it helps to achieve a correct exposure. For ISO, set it as 800 (default ISO of Fuji mini film). For aperture, set it the same as which you set on your TL70. Then you will get a number of time automatically.

If the time shows “1/1000”, you need to apply ND2 for shooting. If the time shows “1/2000”, use ND4. If the time shows “1/4000”, use ND8.

 

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As long as protecting the lens, the hood can avoid glare and lens flare. So basically you can apply the hood always.

 

 

CC 1420 LECTURE 7: DAILY CLEANING CHECKLIST#2 – FOR MINT INSTANTFLEX TL70

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INTRODUCTION
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In lecture 2, we have discussed about a cleaning method for the Polaroid SX-70 cameras. After opening the film door, it is easy to see if the rollers are clean. But for some other instant cameras like InstantFlex TL70, it may be difficult to check the rollers as they are located inside the camera body. Don’t worry, we have a solution for this. Apart from asking MiNT warranty centre for regular service, you can do it yourself.

 

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When is the time to clean the rollers?

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When you found that there are some unwanted white spots or marks shown on the film, this is probably the cleaning time.

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1. Put double sided tape on one side of the film in order to make this side sticky.

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Noted: We recommend you use the Scotch Permanent Double Sided Tape and don’t stick the tape on double sides of film at one time. If the tape is too thick the film may be hard to be ejected from the camera.

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2. Open the film door and put the film close to the rollers, assist with hand.

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3. Press the film-ejecting button.

4. When the rollers are pressing the film, the tape sticks away the dirt on one rollers.

Noted: As the width of film is shorter than the length of rollers, when you place the film near the ejecting mouth, put it incline to one side first, and the other side next, this can make sure you clean the whole roller.

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5. Repeat step 2 to 4. This time, turn the film over and let the sticky side touch the other roller.

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6. Try to do the above steps several time until you think it is okay.

Noted: If you think the the tapes aren’t sticky anymore, you should change a new film with new tape to continue.

CC 1420 LECTURE 6: POLAROID TROUBLE SHOOTING – UNDER/OVER-EXPOSED IMAGE

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INTRODUCTION
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Controlling the exposure value (EV) could be really challenging to both beginners and experienced users. Sometimes you may find it difficult to correctly set the exposure wheel. This may result in over/ under-exposed shots.

Impossible film can be mainly classified into two types: high ISO (600) and low ISO (SX-70). Many people are confused about HOW to take a correctly exposed picture.

 

PART 1.

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Tips about setting the brightness

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To use 600 film in a default ISO100 camera(e.g. SX-70 Model 1, Model 2, Sonar, Alpha)

⇒ Use Flash (half power)/ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to darken (black) / Use ND filter

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To Use SX-70 film in default ISO100 camera

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

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To use 600 film in default ISO600 camera (e.g.SLR670a/SLR680)

⇒ In normal case, you should keep the exposure wheel in the middle position

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To use SX-70 film in default ISO600 camera

⇒ Turn the exposure wheel all the way to lighten (white)

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PART 2.

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Reasons of Under/Over-exposed image

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Film to use corresponding to indoor/ outdoor?

You are suggested to use flash high ISO film (600) indoor and low ISO film (100) outdoor. If you plan to take pictures in both indoor and outdoor, you should use low ISO film and use flash if necessary.

In a condition of very bright light, even when you use SX-70 film (ISO100 film), it is still possible to result in over-exposed images. There are 2 solutions: adjust the exposure wheel to darken, or use an ND filter and keep the exposure wheel in the middle position.

Most of the SX-70 cameras are programmed as ISO100. In most cases you should use corresponding SX-70 film (ISO100 film) as this will ensure the image is correctly exposed. If you want to use 600 film (approx. 6 times more light sensitive than SX-70 film) in your SX-70 camera, you need to put an ND filter before shooting or you will get over-exposed images.

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Temperature differs?

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Photo tends to look pale and with low contrast under cold weather.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9When shooting in hot weather, the image tends to look darker and grainy.

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Shield after shooting?

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Impossible film tends to be sensitive to light. Shield the picture immediately after ejection and avoid exposure under the Sun or bright light. You can use the darkslide (the black cover that ejects immediately after you insert a new film pack) to cover the image. Or even better, use Impossible Frog Tongue to make the shielding easier. Once it is ejected, leave the picture face down for 10 minutes for Impossible B&W films, and 30 minutes for colour films. This will largely increase the successful rate of developing nice pictures.

 

REMARKS

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  1. Frog Tongue is available for all boxtype/ folding SX-70 and Image/Spectra cameras.

2. The light bulbs on top of SX-70 is the original Polaroid Flash Bar. It is a disposable flash with a 10-times use flashbulb unit. Suitable for SX-70 Camera/ OneStep Rainbow. These flash bars are no longer manufactured and have been gradually replaced by electronic flash.

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That’s why MINT created MiNT Flash Bar 2, which is a revolutionary re-usable high quality electronic flash bar device for all Polaroid folding and box-type SX-70 type cameras. It comes with 2 filters for your creativity.

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3. Lens Set for Polaroid SX-70 Cameras is also available. The set includes Fisheye, Close-up, Blue filter, Yellow filter, and ND filter. You can get as close as 12cm, take selfies with friends, get the nice blue colour of the sky, create higher contrast in B&W photos, and shoot 600 film in SX-70 cameras. It is definitely another must have item besides the flash.

CC 1420 Lecture 5: SX-70 trouble shooting – Undeveloped patch

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SYMTOM

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It is quite common to have undeveloped patch on your Polaroid / Impossible films. No matter you are taking photos with SX-70, 680 or 690 camera, you may have experienced undeveloped patch. It could be due to dried chemical, or uneven roller pressure. This is fairly normal. 

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Why three chemical patches?

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It is because the Impossible film is vertically divided by three parts. When you take pictures with SX-70, two rollers push the chemicals out of the pouches, and let the chemicals to be evenly distributed on the image. Therefore, if the undeveloped patch is located at the centre of film, probably it means there is a problem on the middle chemical pack.

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POSSIBLE REASONS

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The earliest film from Impossible

The film production technique was not as mature as today’s, so problems arose. For example, PX70 First flush film was much likely to have undeveloped patch than the Impossible’s latest Color 600, White Frame 3.0. 

We recommend choosing films in a later phase like Color protection film and B&W 2.0. They have less chance to have undeveloped patch.

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Film storage

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If you place your films in a hot, humid place or even under sunlight, an unfavourable chemical reaction may result and lead to agglomeration of chemical. The rollers may not smoothly push the chemicals out and thus affecting the result image.

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Rollers

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Aside from the storage of film, there is also a possibility of splotchy rollers or damage of rollers that the chemicals could not be pushed out and distributed evenly on the picture.

 

SOLUTIONS

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Your gesture

You can gently hold the film door (but don’t block the picture exit slot under front edge) when taking picture.

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Clean the rollers

Refer to lecture 2 >>

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Change Polaroid 680 / 690 rollers to new ones

Cleanliness of the rollers is utterly important. But there is one more thing, Dr. Love from The Impossible Project states that

“For any of you who happen to own an SLR 680, you know it is a beautifully well-crafted work of art of instant electronic machinery….it also tends to produce more ‘divots’ or [‘undeveloped patches’] than your friend’s SX-70 camera.

You may be wondering…why?

The simple answer here is the one thing in the ejection process that changes from the older SX-70 cameras to the SLR 680 and 690 model folding cameras, that is the rollers.

The roller set on these cameras are a little different than the ones found on the SX-70s. The rollers were changed to improve durability and grip on the film, but in the case of newer, more sensitive Impossible films, sometimes there is a less perfect spread of developer leaving the gap of paste at the top of the frame.”

Read more: http://bit.ly/VObMfv

So we highly recommend you to change the old rollers on Polaroid 680 / 690 to achieve the best performance!

CC 1235 Lecture 3: Decoding the Impossible Code on your Impossible film

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Look at the back of an Impossible film and you will discover a series of numbers at the edge of chemical pouches. What does this 10-digit-code mean?

In a moment you are going to decode these numbers. Are you ready? Here we go!

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0415443213

You can break down the code into 5 groups, you will know the production date and type of film by reading this code.

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1st and 2nd numbers: Production month

3rd and 4th numbers: Production year

5th and 6th numbers: Machine used for the production (for internal records)

7th and 8th numbers: Film type

9th and 10th numbers: Production day

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Here is the list of various film type codes used as the 7th and 8th numbers:

02: B&W film for SX-70

32: B&W film for 600 and Image / Spectra

70/72: Color film for SX-70 (including Monochrome Cyan SX-70)

80/82: Color film for 600 and Image / Spectra (including Monochrome Magenta and Cyan 600)

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So “0415443213” means that the film is a B&W film for 600 and Image / Spectra which was produced on 13th April 2015 by machine #44. Isn’t it easy to decode?

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Next time when you are contacting the customer service of Impossible, please state the number of the film as it is easy for the team to understand which film you are referring to and its exact production date!

CC 1235 Lecture 2: Fresh film and expired film

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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#11How to know when the film is produced or expired?

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#12On the packaging of The Impossible Project film, there is a 4-digit number (MM.YY). And there are two types of dates: one is ‘production date’, the other is the ‘best before date’. If it is ‘production date’, then use it within 1 year since the production date. If it is ‘best before date’, then use it before the stamped dates. It is suggested that the film should be used before the date printed in order to obtain the best photographic result.

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(Credits: The impossible Project)
In 2016, The Impossible Project will gradually unify the date system. All new packages are going to be stamped with production dates regardless of box types.

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While you will find only ‘best before date’ on Fujifilm instant film. It is suggested that the film should be used before the date printed.

 

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CC 1235 Lecture 1: Choose right film for my camera

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IMPOSSIBLE EVOLUTION
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Old cameras & new films

After Polaroid Corporation announced that all instant films would no longer be produced after 2008, The Impossible Project was founded and bought the entire Polaroid factory in EnschedeNetherlands – they pledged to bring Polaroid film back.

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AT PRESENT
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The Impossible Project is the only company in the world producing instant films for classic Polaroid SX-70 and 600 cameras. Another famous Japan-based company Fujifilm produces not only digital cameras but also instant cameras and films. 

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In this lecture, you will know clearly about films that are still being widely used and how to choose the right film for your camera.

 

THE IMPOSSIBLE PROJECT
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Instant films produced by The Impossible Project can be categorised by 4 types:

instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#3 Polaroid SX-70 – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#4 Polaroid 600-Type  – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#5 Polaroid Image / Spectra – Color / Black & White
instant-university_CC1235-lecture-1-choose-right-film-for-my-camera-#6 8×10 Cameras and Backs – Color / Black & White

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It’s easy to know which film is compatible with your camera. Simply open the film door and you will see a sticker indicating “600” type film / “SX-70” type film / “Image” or “Spectra” type film.

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Polaroid SX-70 film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid SX-70
– Polaroid SX-70 Model 3
– Polaroid Onestep
-Polaroid Time Zero Onestep
– Polaroid 1000
– Polaroid 1000 Deluxe
– Polaroid Supercolor 1000 Deluxe
– Polaroid 3000
– Polaroid Pronto! RF

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Polaroid 600 film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid 600 Autofocus 660
– Polaroid SLR 680
-Polaroid SLR 690
– Polaroid Integral 600 series
– Polaroid One Step close-up
– Polaroid One Step AF Autofocus Digital Exposure System
– Polaroid Sun 600 LMS Light Management System

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Polaroid Image / Spectra film
is acceptable with:

– Polaroid Spectra / Image series

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In March 2015, Impossible announced the initial launch of Generation 2.0 (Gen2.0) film for the Black & White line. Now, the newly launched Black & White films work with all types of cameras stated above. New formula of Black & White has a quicker developing time, increased contrast and tonality.

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In January 2016, Impossible launches Generation 3.0 (Gen3.0) film for the Color line. At present, it is exclusively for Impossible Member to test before general release. This generation of color film marks a significant improvement on Impossible’s current 600 color film formula. Photos develop in less half the time.

 

FUJIFILM
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Fujifilm now has 3 types of film: Instax mini film, Instax wide film and FP-film (packfilm). They are available in color films only. FP-3000B (ISO 3000 Black & White) was discontinued in May 2015.

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Instax mini film
is acceptable with:

– MiNT InstantFlex TL70
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 7S
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 8
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 25
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 50S
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 70
– Fujifilm Instax Mini 90 NEO CLASSIC
– Lomo’Instant series

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Instax wide film
is acceptable with:

– Fujifilm Instax 210 Wide
– Fujifilm Instax Wide 300
– Lomo’Instant Wide series

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FP-100C film
is designed to be used in the instant backs for medium format SLR cameras and Polaroid Land cameras. 

CC 1420 Lecture 4: Travel survival kit – For your Polaroid cameras

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INSTRUCTION
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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#1The following list offers broad guidelines; from
emergency preparedness to responsive planning
when facing certain sudden occurrences about your instant camera during travel.

Of course, if you are not expert in camera maintenance & repair, you may feel helpless in this matter – don’t forget you are going to be a certified professional! We have got you covered!

 

CHECKLIST
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Empty pack
(always bring an empty film pack with good battery along the way)

 

SYMPTOM
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1. Sticky film (i.e. when you can’t take any picture / the camera doesn’t respond)
2. The camera won’t close
3. The viewfinder goes dark

 

Possible causes

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 The mirror inside did not flip back down
instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 You didn’t press the shutter long enough to give instruction to the camera
instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 Part of camera is either blocked or jammed during exposure

 

Solution

Empty film pack testing
→ If you have a used and not-so-successful film e.g. overexposed, bring it with you when traveling. This comes in very handy when you need to diagnose problems, or you want to change film even if you have not finished the current pack.

STEP(1) Open the camera film door, you should find a small black plastic curtain. Through the black plastic curtain, find the upper most film of the film pack and insert the used film on top of it. The used film will act like a shield and block any light contacting the film.

STEP(2) Now you can remove the pack out of your camera safely.

STEP(3) Make sure the card covers the whole sheet of film. Slightly adjust after pulled the pack out. 

STEP(4) Insert the empty film pack you have prepared. Press the shutter for a few times. Take out the film pack from the camera.

STEP(5) Repeat step 4 for several times. It is like restarting the camera and setting it back to normal.

STEP(6) DONE!

 

SYMPTOM
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Some dots, weird bright or dark strips appear on image.

 

Possible cause

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 Splotchy rollers (Chemicals or dusts accumulated on rollers can cause unsatisfied out of tune images or even failure of ejection)

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Solution

Clean the rollers by yourself

STEP(1) Get a cotton cloth and dip it with sterilising fluid. You can easily find cotton and isopropyl alcohol in the first aid box in hotel room. You can also try using wipes or wet cotton.

STEP(2) Wipe the rollers from one side to another, until the white patches are all removed.

STEP(3) The fluid should dry itself quickly without wiping it off.

STEP(4) Your camera will run like new!

P.S. It is possible for both Polaroid and Impossible Project films to have too much chemicals. Remember to clean the rollers regularly!

 

SYMPTOM

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The camera does not respond at all

 

There are hundreds of feasible reasons. These are the most common ones.

Possible cause #1

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 Camera intermittent failure caused by extreme physical coldness

Solution

Try to put the camera in your coat pocket and use body temperature to warm it up.

 

Possible cause #2

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 Disconnection of film pack

Solution

Try empty film pack testing. Take out the film cartridge and insert it back. Make sure you pop the cartridge into place with some strength. Hold the front edge but not blocking the picture exit slot).

If your film was bought long time ago (more than 1 year), the battery may run out and die. It cannot be used anymore because it simply does not start the camera up.

 

SYMPTOM

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A black viewfinder

 

Possible cause

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-4-travel-survival-kit-for-your-Polaroid-cameras-#4 If your camera operates normally and can take photos, just that the viewfinder goes dark, you can try pulling the film cartridge out and put back in for several times. For better result, try empty film pack testing to reset the camera. If the problem continues, it is possible that the slingshot under the accordion has lost its elasticity.

 

Solution

What you can do is to use some objects to raise and hold up the accordion, to hold the mirror within the viewfinder. Then, you can continue shooting! However, this can only cure the symptoms, not the disease. In long term, you have to repair the camera after traveling.

CC 1420 Lecture 3: Air traveling with instant films and cameras

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WHY ANNOTATE?
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Many Instant Photographers may have the same X-ray concern about carrying undeveloped films when traveling. In this chapter, you will learn what to do and what NOT to do when traveling, without X-ray damaging to your instant films and cameras.

 

HOW?
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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#3Before departure

BRING FILMS AS CARRY-ON LUGGAGE

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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#5Unprocessed film is sensitive to light just as they are waiting to be exposed. Although Impossible Project film has a rather low ISO of 160 for SX-70, and ISO 640 for 600 cameras, X-ray of checked baggage screener may still penetrate and expose the film. Whereas carry-on baggage screener has a much milder X-ray – films under ISO800 such as Fujifilm instax mini film and instax wide film are usually not affected.

So never pack unprocessed film in baggage that will be checked. Or you can politely insist on hand-inspection of the film whenever possible.

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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

PHOTOGRAPHING IN EXTREME TEMPERATURES

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#8Extreme cold guideinstant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#8

When you want to take photos in a freezing cold place (e.g. -10°C to -15°C / 14°F to 5°F and below), you should put the camera inside your bag or  your coat pocket and keep it near your body prior to shooting. Using your body temperature is a good way to ensure that your camera will work well.

Instant film is highly sensitive to temperature. After the camera ejects picture, immediately place it in your pocket or directly onto heat pads. A moderate room temperature of around 25°C / 77°F is optimal for developing camera pictures. Warm the photo with your body temperature is the easiest way. Low temperature will overexpose a photo. It may look bluish, lightened and less contrasted.

instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9Extreme hot guideinstant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#9

Travelling in a place with hot weather (e.g. 35°C to 40°C / 95°F to 104°F and above) is a different situation. Keeping the developing image under shade and keep it cool will help correcting the white balance and prevent reddish and yellowish to a large extent. DO NOT leave the exposing photo under direct sunlight.

Tips:
Hot temperature has a greater effect on B&W film than color. If you wish to get a better result with Polaroid cameras, snap with Impossible Color Film!

Impossible Project film can deliver good results when used within a temperature range of 13°C to 28°C / 55°F to 82°F, while 5°C to 40°C / 41°F to 104°F for Fujifilm instant film.

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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

SHIELDING

Even with Color Protection Film, it is possible to be overexposed under strong sunlight. The first few seconds are extremely crucial for image development. Always shield the film from light when it is ejected.

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Can I use a black card, to cover the film with a hand or quickly turn the photo upside down?

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To put a black card at picture exit slot is economical and may help, but it will not work as perfect as the Frog Tongue from Impossible Project.

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instant-university_CC1420-lecture-3-air-traveling-with-instant-films-and-cameras-#7After arrival

THE USE OF MANUAL FOCUS

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Some Polaroid cameras such as SX-70 Sonar, use sonar to auto focus. When you are on a coach or railway cabin, visiting in museum or aquarium, as long as there is glass between you and the object, the sonar auto focus will not work because sonar will bounce back when it hits the glass. In order to shoot through glass, simply switch to manual focus and you are good to go!